Blogs

Cornwall's Kings and a civilised, outward looking and trading Cornwall 1,000 years ago!

Early Cornish kings feasted on oysters, roast pork and fine wine, archaeologists have found.

Excavations at Tintagel Castle have also revealed they imported bowls from Turkey and glass goblets from Spain.

Findings from a dig last year have been released this week, as archaeologists return to the site to find out how people lived more than 1,000 years ago.

The first research excavations at the castle in decades unearthed finds from the late 5th and 6th Centuries.

Lughnasadh - The Celtic Harvest Festival

The last Celtic Feast day of the year is Lughnasa, also spelled Lughnasadh, the harvest festival  observed August 1st and which is named after the Celtic God Lugh. God of the sun, light and harvests, Lugh was a great warrior. According to the Ulster Cycle he fathered the legendary Cú Chulainn and is linked to a number of sites in Ireland. Lugh spent part of his childhood in the Isle of Man where he was trained by Manannán mac Lir, said to be first ruler of the Isle of Man.

Authorities Betray the Welsh Language to Property Developers - Critics cite Cultural Suicide - Welsh Language Society Condemns

The passing of the 1536 and 1542 Acts of Union made English the language of law and administration of government. Although the Welsh language was not banned, it lost its status and centuries of steady linguistic decline followed.  Until the mid-19th century, the majority of the Welsh population could speak Welsh – more than 80%. The 2001 census showed that 20.8% of the population was able to speak Welsh (582,400 people), an increase compared to the 1991 census (18.7%).

Ceremony held in Ireland to mark the 90th anniversary of the death of Constance Markievicz

A commemoration was held on Saturday at Lissadell House, Sligo in Ireland to mark the 90th anniversary of the death of Constance Markievicz (February 1868 – 15 July 1927). Known as Countess Markievicz she took part in the 1916 Rising. In the Rising she fought in Dublin's St Stephen's Green where the fighters held out for six days, only stopping when the British brought them a copy of Patrick Pearse's surrender order. She was taken to Dublin Castle and then transported to Kilmainham Gaol.

Scotland's oldest surviving book still in Scotland: The Celtic Psalter

Scotland's Celtic Psalter dates from the 11th Century and contains hand-written psalms in bold, clear Irish miniscule script giving a text of the Psalms in Latin. The 1,000 years old psalter, which is the oldest Scottish book still in Scotland, has Gaelic and Pictish Celtic illustrations. With its extraordinary illuminations in vivid green, red, purple and gold, it has been described as Scotland's version of the famous Book of Kells in Dublin. The Book of Kells/Leabhar Cheanannais is kept in the library of Dublin's Trinity College and was made by Celtic Monks around 800AD.

Remains of wooden hut where Saint Columba studied and prayed identified

The remains of the wooden hut where Saint Columba was thought to have meditated and prayed on Iona have been dated to his lifetime. Saint Columba (Gaelic: Colm Cille) is credited with spreading Christianity in Scotland. He was the great-great-grandson of Niall Noígíallach, Irish high king who reigned in the late 4th and early 5 centuries, and ancestor of the Uí Néill family who were dominant in Ireland from the 6th to the 10th century.

Celtfest Isle of Man - A Fresh New Look for a Familiar Festival!

There's a fresh new look for a familiar festival later this month as the much cherished Yn Chruinnaght Inter-Celtic Festival steps forward with a resplendent new make-over, in an effort to introduce Manx and Celtic culture to a wider audience.

With Yn Chruinnaght as the organising force behind the festival, Celtfest Isle of Man will focus this year on a fine selection of upbeat Celtic music, showcasing some of the finest bands and solo artists from Ireland and Scotland - with a number of concerts to suit all tastes at the Centenary Centre in Peel.

Whales visit Irish waters in "exceptional" numbers

Whales are visiting Irish waters more frequently, with the number of minke whales in particular being seen described as "exceptional". This is a recent report from the Mannin Branch of the Celtic League which highlights an article in the Irish Times: 

TIME OF THE WHALES

Whales are arriving earlier, staying longer and being seen in greater numbers of the South and East of Ireland according to this article from Irish Times Marine correspondent Lorna Siggins:

Alba: Misneachd protest as Gaelic 'airbrushed' from history

News from Mannin Branch of the Celtic League:

Christopher Lewin has this report about a recent protest by the Scottish group Misneachd at the National Museum of Scotland:

“I was present at a protest outside the National Museum of Scotland last month concerning the lack of Gaelic in a new exhibition about the Jacobites.

The demonstration was organised by the group Misneachd, which is an offshoot of the Irish organisation which was the topic of my last article.

The Disneyfication of Tintagel

Media Release

Following requests from many media outlets regarding Tintagel, Kernow Matters To Us (KMTU) releases the following statement:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - blogs