Places to visit

Giant's Grave

A Bronze Age grave from approximately 1000 BC. Once covered by a circular mound but now exposed on one side, when a road was cut through the site. Most of the monument remains covered by a raised ground bank.

Ballafayle Cairn

Ballafayle Cairn

These are the remains of a Neolithic burial site believed to date from 2000 - 1500 BC. The site consists of a wedge shaped cairn, which contains stones that have been fused by heat and with a dry stone wall on one side. Cremated burials have been found in the cairn. There is a concave bank with standing stones and a paved forecourt.

Rushen Abbey

Rushen Abbey

The village of Ballasalla (Balley Sallagh) named from Gaelic 'Place of the Willow Tree' is largely built from the remains of Rushen Abbey which was built in the 1100's. Ballasalla has close ties with Castletown and is near to Ronaldsway Airport, built between Ballasalla and Castletown. Ronaldsway was named after the medieval King Reginald of Mann by the Norse.

Castle Rushen

Castle Rushen

Castletown (Balley Chashtal) was once the capital of the Isle of Man and is dominated by the superb fortress of Castle Rushen home to the Kings and Lords of Mann for many centuries. It is one of Europe's most finely preserved medieval castles.

Ballaharra Stones

Ballaharra Stones

The Ballaharra Stones were uncovered during an extension of the Ballaharra Sandpit in 1971. The stones originally sat above a large tomb as part of a set of six. This two chambered tomb, which contained significant cremation deposits was carbon dated from 2300BC. Although two of the stones had been crushed, the four remaining were donated by the owners of the Ballaharra Sandpit to German Parish Commissioners, who erected the stones in St. John's near Tynwald Hill.

Cashtal yn Ard

Cashtal yn Ard

Cashtal yn Ard (The Castle of the Heights) is one of the best ancient monuments on the Isle of Man. It is one of three Neolithic tombs, dating from about 2000 BC. It is well preserved and one of the largest of its kind in the British Isles. The monument was originally a megalithic chambered Cairn holding five chambers and extending over 130 feet long. Sites of this type were used as communal burial places for Neolithic chieftains and their families.

Hango Hill

Hango Hill

Ancient place of execution. Here, Illiam Dhone, a National hero to Manx people, was shot on the 2nd of January 1663 for his part in the Manx rising of 1651. The ruins are those of a late 17th century summerhouse known as Mount Strange. It is also possibly a prehistoric burial site with an artificial mound. Its name comes from the Norse 'Hanga-Haugr', meaning Gallows Hill.

Tynwald Hill - Cronk-y-Keeillown

Tynwald Hill - Cronk-y-Keeillown

The Norse governed the island for over four hundred years from 800 AD to 1265 AD. In 1079, Godred Crovan invaded the Isle of Man and ruled it for 16 years. It is believed that under his rule the Tynwald Parliament was established and the Isle of Man is thought to have the longest unbroken parliament in the world.

The Spiral Stone

The Spiral Stone

A boulder rock decorated with spiral patterns. It is possibly late Neolithic or early Bronze Age.

St Michael's Chapel - Keeill Michael

St Michael's Chapel - Keeill Michael

St Michael's Chapel is a Celtic-Norse twelfth century chapel built on the site of an earlier Celtic Keeill. The remains of the chapel are located on the south of St Michael's Isle (Ellan Noo Mael). The island is connected to Langness Peninsula by a causeway. Langness (Langlish) gets it's name from the Old Norse name Langness meaning long promontory. There is evidence of human activity on St Michael's Isle from the Mesolithic period. It was also the site of two significant battles between the English, Scottish and Manx for control of the island.

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